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Table 2 Effects of FFP/RBC ratio on mortality outcome

From: Trauma-induced coagulopathy and critical bleeding: the role of plasma and platelet transfusion

Authors Year Patients FFP/RBC ratio Results
Borgman 2007 246 <1:4 vs. 1:4—1:2 vs. >1:2 Improved in-hospital survival in highest ratio group (OR 8.6, CI 2.1–35.2)
Maegele 2008 713 <0.9 vs. 0.9—1.1 vs. >1.1 Decreased 30-day mortality in highest ratio group (24 vs. 46%, p < 0.001)
Duchesne 2008 135 <1:2 vs. >1:2 Increased mortality in low-ratio group (RR 18.9; CI 6.3–56.4)
Holcomb 2008 466 <1:2 vs. ≥1:2 Improved 30-day survival in high plasma transfusion group (73 vs. 43%, p < 0.001)
Zink 2009 466 <1:4 vs. 1:4—1:1 vs. ≥1:1 Decreased in-hospital mortality in high plasma transfusion groups (ARR of 29%)
Sperry 2008 415 <1:1.5 vs. ≥1:1.5 High plasma ratio is independently associated with lower mortality (HR 0.48, CI 0.3–0.8)
Gunter 2008 259 <2:3 vs. ≥2:3 Decreased 30-day morality in high plasma transfusion groups
Kashuk 2008 133 1:1 vs. 1:2 vs. 1:3 vs. 1:4 vs. ≥1:5 The lowest predicted mortality probability correlates with a plasma/red cell ratio of 1:2 and 1:3.
Teixeira 2009 383 ≤1:8 vs. 1:8—1:3 vs. 1:3—1:2 vs. >1:2 Linear correlation between survival and plasma transfusion ratio. No survival advantage after plasma transfusion ratio reaches 1:3